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Rabbi Rubenstein’s Sedra questions - past and present.

Fri, 03/09/2010

I hope the ideas contained below, will provide you with some topics for discussion, at your Shabbos table.

A widow came in to the house of the Malbim (1809-1880; his Yarhtzeit is the first day of Rosh Hashanah). Crying bitterly, she described how her husband had recently died leaving her with no source of income; and how she could not bear the sight of her children starving and destitute. The Malbim said to her “Tell me what are really good at?” She replied “My cheese blintzes are really outstanding”. He said to her, “Start selling your cheese blintzes, I give you permission to call them the Malbim’s cheese blintzes”. (He also gave her the money to buy the first amounts of flour and cheese). “When you get some money from your first sale you will be able to expand further”. She did this; she was in fact very good at making cheese blintzes and in time became very successful.

I think we can take this as a metaphor for how we should behave in this week before Rosh Hashanah. We should take one mitzvah we are good at, and do it more. Alternatively we should take something bad we do, but could easily change, and proceed to correct it. What is the point of talking about the Chofetz Chaim or dreaming of becoming a saint overnight, if it has no relevance to our real selves? We need to try and identify an improvement which is easy for us to do and start there, and then success breeds success. This is a realistic approach to Teshuvah; it is the approach which was encouraged by Rabbi Yisroel Salanter. In the words of the verse in this week’s Sedra (which according to the Ramban are referring to the mitzvah of Teshuva). “It is not in heaven, neither is it across the seas, it is your mouth and your hearts to do it.

SOURCES; The life and work of the Malbim & the letters of Rabbi Yisroel Salanter.

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QUESTION FOR THE WEEK;

Moshe Rabbeinu said to the Jewish People in Chap. 31, Verse 2 “Today I am 120 years old and not able to go out and to come in and Hashem has said to me you shall not pass this Jordan”. Rashi comments this means he said, on this day the years and the days that had been allotted to him had been filled. The question is, in Bamidbar Chapter 27 Verse 13, Hashem said to Moshe Rabeinu, the time has come for you to die, go up the mountain and view the land, for you will not go there. Rashi comments, Hashem had said to Moshe Rabbeinu, if you had sanctified my name properly when you were meant to speak to the rock and produce water, this would not have been your time to die. So the problem is, had he not sinned at the rock, would he still have died at the age of 120, or would he have lived longer?

ANSWER; Maharal

The Maharal answers that according to the natural life which had been allotted to him, his life was due to end on that day, but because he had so many extraordinary great merits, he might have lived longer. However, because of the sin of hitting the rock, his life span was restricted to its natural length, and was not increased because of his merits.

SOURCE; Gur Aryeh Al Hatorah

If you have any comments, answers, or information, on any of the above, please E-mail me, or tell me.

Please note my new E-mail address is [email protected]

Have a wonderful Shabbos

Jacob Rubinstein (Rabbi)

 

 

 

 


Fri, 27/08/2010

I hope the ideas contained below, will provide you with some topics for discussion, at your Shabbos table.

Rabbi Yisroel Meir Lau, relates how he visited an Israeli poet who was drunk. The poet said to the Rav “Forgive me that I am drunk but I am like Noach who got drunk after the flood. I went back after the war to my home town in Poland and found my home, my school, my whole community, totally destroyed, as if by a flood. In order to forget it I have to drink.”
Rabbi Lau also met Cardinal Jan Lustiger of Paris who was born Aaron Lustiger. His parents were killed in Auschwitz. His response was to become a Catholic. On their Yahrtzeit he used to put on a cappel and go to shul to say Kaddish.
But Rabbi Lau also met Rebbetzen Tzilla Sorotzkin who survived Auschwitz. She was known as the angel of Auscwitz because of the way she helped people there. After the war she was in Lodz,and heard a strange noise. She went into a building, and found an old man with a beard teaching small children alef beis. She fainted; when she was revived, she cried tears of joy and said, if we are still teaching young children alef beis, then we have won and Hitler has lost.
I am writing these episodes very briefly, but they illustrate clearly the responsibility every Jew has to take Judaism forward. This week`s Sedra says (Chap. 27 Verse 9) “This day you have become a people”. The Talmud (Brochos 63b) comments, it was actually 40 years earlier that they had become a people, when they received the Torah at Sinai, but the verse means, every single day we should feel as if we have just received the Torah. I explain, it is like a chain, if one link is broken, the connection between previous links and future links is completely broken. In fact the Talmud continues, Rabbi Tanchum the son of Rabbi Chiya said, the proof is, if you say the Shema every day, and then one day you fail to, it is as if you have never read it. The Dubna Magid explains; by failing to say it one day, you have lost all the impetus gained in the previous days.
It is the same as far as passing on the traditions of Judaism are

concerned. Every Jew who identifies with Judaism is a link in a chain which goes back to Sinai. If we fail to maintain that link, the effect of the whole chain is lost. Our choices about strengthening our Judaism, are not only about ourselves, they are also about about our responsibility to ensure that the chain goes on, into the future.

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QUESTION FOR THE WEEK;

What was actually written on the stones described in the first two verses of Chapter 27?

ANSWER;

According to the Ibn Ezra a list of the Mitzvos of the Torah; according to the Ramban the whole of the Torah including the crowns written on the letters in a Sefer Torah.

Sources: Ramban
 

If you have any comments, answers, or information, on any of the above, please E-mail me, or tell me.

Please note my new E-mail address is [email protected]

Have a wonderful Shabbos

Jacob Rubinstein (Rabbi)

 

 

 

 


Fri, 27/08/2010

I hope the ideas contained below, will provide you with some topics for discussion, at your Shabbos table.

The story is told of Rav Chiya, that his wife constantly treated him badly. Nevertheless when Rav Chiya found something in the marketplace which was suitable for her, he would buy it and wrap it up carefully, to give it to her as a present. Another Rav asked him, why do you do this for her, when she makes life so difficult for you? Rav Chiya replied, It is enough for us, that they bring up our children and save us from immoral thoughts(Talmud Yevomos 63a).
Behind this story there is a great lesson. Here was a woman who did many things Rav Chiya would have been entitled to resent. But instead, he chose to concentrate on the good things she did for him. When Rav Pam, of Yeshivas Torah Vodaas in N.Y. used to tell this story over, he used the phrase”Mie-ut Hatov Eino Botel Berabos Hora”-A small amount of good is not made worthless by a lot of bad.
Unfortunately a lot of people take the opposite route. Even if someone, including a spouse, does many good things for them, but also does something bad, all they remember is the bad, and bear a grudge because of it.
How far we should go in the right direction is indicated by the command in this week`s Sedra; You shall not hate an Egyptian, because you were strangers in his land. In other words we should be grateful for their hospitality. Although we all know how much pain they inflicted on us, there were years when we did well in Egypt, and we have to be grateful for them.
These are extreme examples. In our families and communities, people do many good things for us, and sometimes they do bad things too. We must concentrate on the good things, and never focus and harp on the bad things. This will allow the memories of the bad to fade and be forgotten; and our families and communities will be much happier.

SOURCES; Sefer “The Pleasant Way”, adapted from the teachings of Horav Avrohom Pam.

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QUESTION FOR THE WEEK;

From the beginning of the month of Ellul until the end of Sucos
We say Ledovid Hashem Ori. Towards the end of it we say, “kee komu vee eidi sheker”, which means “for false witnesses have arisen against me”. How can we apply these words of King David to ourselves; presumably we have not all been accused in court by false witnesses?

ANSWER;
The Malbim in one explanation says, it means arguments against Hashem have arisen within my mind when I have seen good people suffering. But the verse continues, “I had faith in the good we will see in the world to come”. This teaching can certainly apply to all of us.

SOURCES; Malbim on Tehillim.

If you have any comments, answers, or information, on any of the above, please E-mail me, or tell me.

Please note my new E-mail address is [email protected]

Have a wonderful Shabbos

Jacob Rubinstein (Rabbi)

 


Fri, 27/08/2010

I hope the ideas contained below, will provide you with some topics for discussion, at your Shabbos table.

Exactly a week ago, as I was driving back from my summer holidays, a police car just behind me, suddenly switched on it`s siren and flashing blue lights. It sped towards me, and then fortunately, past me, and on to an unknown destination. Although this has happened to me countless times before, it still gave me a jolt.
It was a good preparation for the sound of the Shofar which we stared to blow on Wednesday morning. We have all heard it before, but it should still give us a jolt.
Every year before the blowing of the Shofar on Rosh Hashonoh, the late Dayan Abramsky used to quote a few lines of Rashi, (from Berochos 35b). Rashi says, if a person eats without making a Brocho, not only is he sinning, he is also causing other people to sin; because people around him will see he doesn`t make a Brocho, and will be less inclined to do so themselves. Therefore he is an associate of the infamous king Yerovom ben Nevot who caused so many people to sin.
When I first read this, I thought, never does this apply more, than in the family situation. If, for example, a parent does not Bentch properly, of course his child will not Bentch properly. Not because the parent told him not to, but because he will automatically, and even subconsciously, imitate his parent. If the parent is bad tempered, of course, the child will be quick to lose his temper, and so the list goes on.
When we hear the sound of the Shofar it is time to revise the example we set our children by our own personal conduct.
Like the king described in this week`s Sedra, who has to take a Sefer Torah with him, wherever he goes. But he also has to have a Sefer Torah in his personal Treasury. His public behaviour must be guided by the Torah, but so must his private behaviour at home. The king described in the Torah. was meant to be a model for all of us. P. G. we should all succeed in the coming year to give a good example to our children, and to those around us, and to have Nachas from them.

SOURCES; Sefer Peninei Rabeinu Yechezkel Page 22.
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QUESTION FOR THE WEEK;

The Talmud (Sanhedrin 7b) learns that you must not appoint as a Dayan, someone who is not really fit to be a Dayan; from the verse which says, you must not plant a grove of trees for idolatry. What is the connection between the two laws?

ANSWER;
If someone is not fit to be a Dayan but is appointed to the position of Dayan, he will decide laws by his own calculations and considerations, rather than by what the Torah says. That is really the first step towards idolatry. Giving more importance to your own ideas, than to the ideas of the Torah, is really serving a god other than Hashem.

SOURCES; Sefer Oruch Laneir

If you have any comments, answers, or information, on any of the above, please E-mail me, or tell me.

Please note my new E-mail address is [email protected]

Have a wonderful Shabbos

Jacob Rubinstein (Rabbi)

 

 

 


Thu, 29/07/2010

I hope the ideas contained below, will provide you with some topics for discussion, at your Shabbos table.

As a postscript to Tisha B`Av; I remember a very great lady describing to me, how she and her husband were hidden in a basement during the Second World War. On one occasion, they heard the couple who were hiding them, arguing upstairs about whether to obey the priest`s sermon to hand over any Jews they knew, to the Nazis.
To this day, I remember the fear which emanated from her in waves, as she relived those moments, when her life hung in the balance. For a moment, I felt a little, of the fear she had felt. It is one thing to remember words, it is another thing altogether, to remember the emotions which accompanied the words. That leaves a far deeper impression.

Similarly when we remember the giving of the Torah, in this week`s Sedra, it is not enough to remember the words of the Torah alone. We need to remember the feelings of awe and inspiration we experienced too. The words which were said, “from the midst of the fire, the cloud, the thick darkness, the voice that did not stop” (Chap. 5 verse 19) had a colossal emotional impact and we have to remember that as well. That is why it says about the giving of the Torah; (Chap. 4 Verse 9) “Guard yourself, in case you forget the things your eyes saw, and in case you remove them from your heart”
In keeping with this idea, it is not enough to do a Mitzvah without feeling, as if it is a burden, to be dealt with, as quickly as possible. We should give as much honour and make as much fuss, for the Mitzvos as we can. That is the way to engage the emotions.
On a personal note I remember, and I am sure everybody who met him remembers, the enthusiasm and the beaming smile, with which my father Z”tsal kept his Judaism. That is how he reached my heart, and the hearts of those around him.

The words in Oleinu, from this Sedra, sum it up; “And you shall know it this day and put it in to your heart”. (Chap 4 Verse 39)
SOURCES; Based on the teachings of Rav Ben-Zion Levy.

QUESTION FOR THE WEEK;

In the first part of Shema, in this week`s Sedra, we are told to teach our sons the Torah (Chapter 6 Verse 7). The usual Hebrew word for “And you shall teach” is “Velimadetem”, as in fact we find in the second part of the Shema. But here the word used is “Veshinantom”. What is the extra nuance, of the word “Veshinantom”?

ANSWER;
Rashi gives one answer. However the Alshiech Hakodosh says, the root of the word is the same as in the Verse, “Chitsei gibor Shinoonim” (Psalm 120)-“The arrows of the mighty person sharpened”. The Alshiech explains, a mighty archer sharpens his arrows, because he wants his arrows, not only to hit the target, but also to penetrate it. So when we teach our sons, we want our words not only to reach our sons, but also to penetrate inside their being.
The Alshiech then proceeds to say, How do we achieve that? The answer is in the preceeding verse of the Shema. “And these things which I teach you this day shall be, “Al Levovecho”-“On your heart”. If these teachings are on your heart, then they will penetrate your sons hearts as well.

SOURCES; Sefer Alshiech on the Torah

If you have any comments, answers, or information, on any of the above, please E-mail me, or tell me.

Please note my new E-mail address is [email protected]

Have a wonderful Shabbos

Jacob Rubinstein (Rabbi)

 

 

 


Fri, 09/07/2010

I hope the ideas contained below, will provide you with some topics for discussion, at your Shabbos table.

“Charles Darwin was only able to think that man is descended from the apes, because he never saw Rabbi Yisroel Salanter”. This statement, made by a pupil of Rabbi Yisroel Salanter means, the Rabbi had such obviously spiritual qualities, they could not possibly be explained by a physical process only. They could only be explained, by accepting that man`s origin comes from a higher being.

In 1983 a distinguished Rav, quoted that saying about Rabbi Yisroel Salanter, and said it applied to Rabbi Moshe Feinstein too. He said, nobody who met Rabbi Moshe Feinstein could believe that human beings were descended from apes.

Rabbi Feinstein himself said; the Torah describes the importance of punishing a murderer by saying “Velo Sachanifu es ho-oretz”. This is usually translated “you shall not corrupt the earth”. But the root of the word “Sachanifu” usually means, “to flatter”, so how does it fit in here? Rabbi Feinstein answered, if we belittle the significance of the murder of a person, we are flattering the physicality, what one might call the earthiness, of the person. Hence the phrase, “you shall not flatter the earth”. We are saying the victim was just another form of physical existence, which has now come to an end. In fact, every person has something spiritual and divine in him, and that is why murder is such a terrible thing. In this age of a movement towards euthanasia, this is a timely thought. Of course, the greater the person, the more these spiritual qualities are apparent.

Similarly, when we mourn, during these three weeks, the destruction of the Temple, we are not mourning the destruction of a beautiful building alone. We are mourning the destruction of the place, in which we were given, the guidance and inspiration, to develop the spiritual and divine within all of us. It reminds us, that developing the spiritual qualities in each of us, is what Jewish life is really all about.

SOURCES; Sefer Dorosh Dorash Moshe.

QUESTION FOR THE WEEK;

The Rambam (Chap 7 Laws of Sefer Torah, Par. 7) writes that the number of lines in each column in a Sefer Torah should be 48, corresponding to the number of Journeys made by the Jewish people in the desert, described in this week`s Sedra. What connection can you think of, between the number of journeys they travelled in the desert, and the number of lines in a column of a Sefer Torah?
(Other opinions say it should be 42 lines which corresponds to opinions there were only 42 journeys. See Sefer Shiras Dovid)

ANSWER;

The journeys were ordained by Hashem to give them various experiences which were necessary to mould and shape their character. Everyone of the lines of the Torah is necessary to shape and mould the character of the Jew.

SOURCES; Sefer Anofeho Arzei E-l.

If you have any comments, answers, or information, on any of the above, please E-mail me, or tell me.

My E-mail address is [email protected]

Have a wonderful Shabbos

Jacob Rubinstein (Rabbi)

 

 

 


Fri, 02/07/2010

I hope the ideas contained below, will provide you with some topics for discussion, at your Shabbos table.

In sport and in business, and in almost every other area of human activity, it is not really the effort that counts, it is the result. Even if you play badly, if you score a goal you have won the game. In business, even if you do not work so hard, if by chance you obtain a big order, you are doing well.
However in Judaism, there is a reward for every iota of effort. Joshua was chosen to succeed Moshe Rabeinu, not because he was the most brilliant student, but because of the constant effort he put in to learning from Moshe. Hashem said to Moshe Rabeinu, “He arrived early at your meeting place and left late. He was the one who arranged the benches before you gave a lecture. He was the one who served you with all his strength. (Midrash Raboh 21)
In a similar vein there is a Midrash which has a discussion about which verse encompasses most of the Torah. On Rav said, “Shemah Yisroel”. Another said “Love your neighbour as yourself”. But a third said the verse from this week`s Parsha, “One sheep you shall bring as a sacrifice in the morning, and the second sheep you shall bring in the afternoon”. Perhaps this means, the key to success in Judaism, is to take constant small steps forward.
Maimonidies writes, you can earn a place in the world to come with ONE Mitzvoh, if you do it properly. In fact Hashem gave us a variety of Mitzvos in order to give us more opportunities, to do that one Mitzvoh.
Every effort is worthwhile and produces a result. In the words of King Solomon “Adding one to one, makes the whole amount” (Koheles 7:27.

SOURCES; Introduction to Sefer Ein Yaakov

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QUESTION FOR THE WEEK;

Why were the Jewish people commanded to attack only the daughters of Midyon and not the daughters of Moav, (Bamidbar Chapter 25:17) although both were equally culpable?

ANSWER;

One answer is, Moav had a slight excuse, because they acted out of fear, but Midyon acted entirely out of malice

SOURCES; Ramban 25: 18.

If you have any comments, answers, or information, on any of the above, please E-mail me, or tell me.

My E-mail address is [email protected]

Have a wonderful Shabbos

Jacob Rubinstein (Rabbi)

 

 

 


Thu, 24/06/2010

I hope the ideas contained below, will provide you with some topics for discussion, at your Shabbos table.

Is it possible to be genuinely generous and charitable, yet mean and unkind at the same time? The answer has to be yes! Many people are happy to be generous to others less fortunate than themselves, but are still resentful and unkind to people in a better position than themselves. They cannot tolerate other people being more successful than themselves, but will be quite kind, to people who are in difficulties and need their help.
As we find ourselves on the threshold of the three weeks, it is salutary to remember, the second Temple was destroyed because as the Talmud puts it (Yoma 9), “They were busy with Torah, Mitzvos and Kindness, but had amongst them needless hatred”: Both things at the same time!
There is a wonderful quality of Ayin Tov which is the opposite of this. It includes not being concerned to keep up with the “Joneses” at all. We might want things and strive for them because we like them, but not because other people have them. Ayin Tov means to be really happy, about another person`s prosperity and success.
Bilaam was shaken to the core of his being, when he saw the tents of the Jewish people arranged in a way that prevented them looking in to one another`s homes (see Rashi). They had no interest in monitoring how well everyone else was doing. He was inspired to give the blessing Ma Tovu …. “How good are your tents …”. Because there was no envy amongst them, the divine presence would be found in their homes .
In the words of King Solomon “Tov Ayin Hu Yevorach”-He who looks benignly at other people, will be blessed (Proverbs 22,9). Or as the Kotsker Rebbe pithily put it, “ If I am (what ever I am) and you are (whatever you are), because I am myself and you are yourself, then I am I and you are you. But if I am because you are, then I am not I and you are not you.

SOURCES; Sefer Matnas Chayim (Maamorim 2) & Sefer Hamussar Vehadaas by Rabbi A. Yoffen.

 

QUESTION FOR THE WEEK;

In Chapter 22 Verse 4, it says Bilaam looked at some of the (Jewish) people. How could he see them, were they not surounded by the clouds of glory?

ANSWER;
The Targum Yonasan says he saw some of the tribe of Dan. They were carrying an idol called Pesel Micah. Therefore they were not protected by the clouds of glory.

SOURCES; Sefer Sucas Dovid.

If you have any comments, answers, or information, on any of the above, please E-mail me, or tell me.

My E-mail address is [email protected]

Have a wonderful Shabbos

Jacob Rubinstein (Rabbi)

 

 

 


Thu, 24/06/2010

I hope the ideas contained below, will provide you with some topics for discussion, at your Shabbos table.

On Erev Shabbos, of the Sedra of Chukas, in Paris in 1242; by the command of King Louis 1X (Known as Louis the Pious), cartloads upon cartloads, filled with manuscripts of Jewish sacred texts, including most of the copies of the Talmud available in France, were burnt in a public square.
In an age when all texts were written by hand, this was a catastrophe for the Jewish people. Many individuals used to fast on the anniversary of that day. What a contrast to the present day, when sacred texts are churned out in enormous numbers, are obtainable everywhere in every language, and are photocopied, E-mailed and available, to everyone. We certainly do not have the challenge of unavailability of texts for Jewish learning.
But we have other challenges. Hashem sends different challenges and different tests to every generation, and to an extent to every individual, to see whether they will rise to the new challenge.
In this week`s Sedra, Moshe Rabeinu made a copper snake to remind the people to pray to Hashem, to save them from the plague which had struck them. Many generations later King Chiskiyohu destroyed that copper snake, so that people would not serve it as an idol. The question is, why did earlier kings not destroy it for the same reason? The Talmud answers, there is always an opportunity left to each generation, to take new measures to safeguard Judaism. Presumably until the time of King Chiskiyohu, the tendency to use the copper snake as an idol was not so widespread. It was a danger which developed during his reign, and he rose to the occasion and dealt with the new problem.
We all need to be proactive in our Judaism, recognising new challenges, and acting appropriately to overcome them. It would be an interesting discussion point, to consider what are the greatest challenges, to Judaism, here and now. I personally think, it is the threat to morality and family life. But I would welcome all suggestions.

SOURCES; Magen Avrohom on Orach Chayim 580-9 & Talmud Chullin 7 .
QUESTION FOR THE WEEK;

We know that Moshe Rabeinu was punished for hitting the rock, and forbidden to enter the Land of Israel. But why did Aharon also receive that punishment, he did not hit the rock?

ANSWER;
The Malbim points out, Aharon was also commanded to speak to the rock-see Chap 20 Verse 8, and he failed to do so. Therefore he too received the punishment.

SOURCES; Malbim on Chumash.

If you have any comments, answers, or information, on any of the above, please E-mail me, or tell me.

My E-mail address is [email protected]

Have a wonderful Shabbos

Jacob Rubinstein (Rabbi)

 

 

 


Thu, 10/06/2010

I hope the ideas contained below, will provide you with some topics for discussion, at your Shabbos table.

This week`s Sedra touches on a very painful and sensitive subject. Korach started a dispute with Moshe Rabeinu, together with On Ben Peles and others. But On Ben Peles is mentioned once at the beginning of the Parsha and then never appears again. The reason is, his wife calmed him down, and persuaded him it was not worthwhile getting involved in the dispute. By contrast, Korach`s wife goaded him on, and persuaded him he had been insulted. In the end Korach`s family suffered terribly, and On Ben Peles`s family flourished.
I personally know of more than one family where brothers had an argument, but it was the wives who took greater offence, and caused the argument to flare up into a massive row, which harmed both families until the end of their lives.
I also know of an instance where two relatives had an argument which was affecting the whole family. Then one them, whom I am sure was in the right, decided the situation was ridiculous. She went and apologised to the other, although she really did not need to, and the whole family was saved. Of course in all these cases it can equally be the husband who makes it worse or better.
Arguments themselves can be bad enough, but the golden rule is; “Don`t get involved in an argument which is not yours” (see Proverbs 26,17) It is the people who take sides and join in, the argument, who cause the greatest harm.

SOURCES; Sanhedrin109b &110a
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QUESTION FOR THE WEEK

Which prophets besides Moshe Rabeinu, said “If no sign occurs I am wrong”?

ANSWER;
Eliyahu Hanavi; Melachim 1, Chap18, Verse 36.
& Michohu; Melachim1, Chap. 22, Verse 28.

If you have any comments, answers, or information, on any of the above, please E-mail me, or tell me.

My E-mail address is [email protected]

Have a wonderful Shabbos

Jacob Rubinstein (Rabbi)

 

 

 


Thu, 29/06/17 | 5 Tammuz 5777

 Shabbat Chukat

Shabbat begins at 9:26 pm

Candle lighting is between 7:56 pm and 8:05 pm

Shabbat ends 10:58 pm


SHABBAT SHALOM

 

 

 

Latest news

Refurbishment

On Thursday 21st July, by an overwhelming majority, the shul agreed to go ahead with the proposed refurbishment.

Thought of the Week - Rev. Brodie

Table Talk - Rabbi Rubenstein

TABLE TALK - Parshayot Nitzavim-Vayelech 5770

I hope the ideas contained below, will provide you with some topics for discussion, at your Shabbos table.

Weekly Halocha - Rabbi Simmonds

ENJOYING A SUMMER SHABBOS - PART 1

1. If you are using your garden on Shabbos ,and want to carry out food furniture toys from the house etc, you must make sure the garden is properly enclosed. Just because it is a private garden does not mean that it is Halachically a “private area” “RESHUS HAYOCHID”. If you are not sure seek competent advice on the issue

2. Climbing up/ on trees or use of a tree house is not permitted on Shabbos.

3. Take care when carrying drinks not to spill any on the soil or grass.